Books


Ask the book buyer about the perfect summer read. Part 3.

 

The sun is shining, the birds are singing and you may well be gearing up for that summer break. Welcome to the final part of our recommendations for holiday reading, says Jarrold book buyer, Chris Rushby.

Dear Reader,

If you’re NOT gearing up for a summer break and don’t want to be reminded of that fact then please forgive this and the two previous edits, the premise of which has been essentially that you’ll be wanting something to read on the beach, or similar (as someone who doesn’t have a holiday now until mid-September I can only sympathise). Nevertheless, there are plenty of us who’ll do as much reading over the next few weeks as we’ll do for the rest of the year, so for those looking for inspiration here’s a third selection of new and new-ish paperback novels, at least one of which should fit the bill. And remember: all these books, along with a host of others, are part of our ‘buy one, get one half price’ offer online and in-store.  

Happy reading (and, if you’re traveling, safe journey),

Chris

 

The Dark Angel

Elly Griffiths

£7.99

Published 12th July 2018

One of our most popular authors is back with the tenth of the Norfolk-set Ruth Galloway mysteries. If you haven’t tried Elly yet the place to start is [link to] The Crossing Places, the first in the series. If you’re up to date, though, her latest features a baking hot Italian setting for much of its action, making it a perfect summer crime read. We’re delighted that Elly Griffiths will be visiting Jarrold on Saturday 14th July to sign copies of her work (click here for tickets). Come and meet one of the warmest, most personable writers we know and get your books signed and dedicated.  

 

The Midnight Line

Lee Child

£7.99

Remarkably, this is the twenty-second Jack Reacher thriller to be published and they say a Lee Child novel is now sold somewhere in the world every nine seconds (quite a hard assertion to check, but I’m sure it must be true). A legion of fans know exactly what they’re getting and won’t be disappointed with this latest instalment. Fortunately for those fans, most of the characters in the novels have obviously never read one, or they’d have realised it’s simply best to keep out of Jack Reacher’s way.  

 

Conversations With Friends

Sally Rooney

£8.99

For the avoidance of doubt I’m not, and in fact never have been, a young woman. If I was, or had been, though, I might find myself agreeing with the Daily Mail journalist who described this novel as ‘the best I've read on what it means to be young and female right now.’ This is a brilliant debut: a dark, sharp, funny, brilliantly observed novel about modern relationships from a young writer who seems destined to go far.

 

Two Kinds Of Truth

Michael Connelly

£7.99

If you haven’t yet read one of Michael Connelly’s best-selling crime thrillers featuring Harry Bosch don’t just take my word he’s worth trying; take Stephen King’s, who calls Connelly 'a master of the genre'. In this outing we find Harry apparently being framed for a crime and needing to turn to lawyer Micky Haller (whom fans will know from another of Connelly’s successful series) for help. It’s a bit like Superman and Batman coming together in a DC comic special.

 

Little Fires Everywhere

Celeste Ng

£7.99

‘Everyone in Shaker Heights was talking about it that summer: how Isabelle, the last of the Richardson children, had finally gone around the bend and burned the house down.’ If that isn’t an opening sentence to make you want to read onward in a novel I don’t know what is. This is quite a hard book to categorise: with elements of thriller, love story, inter-generational relationships and race issues there’s something in this intelligently written piece of fiction to appeal to a broad range of readers.

 

The Mitford Murders

Jessica Fellowes

£7.99

Finally, a good old-fashioned novel for fans of retro British crime fiction, written by the author of the best-selling Downton Abbey books. It's 1919 and Louisa Cannon’s dream of escaping a life of poverty in London is a nursemaids’s position in the Mitford household deep in the Oxfordshire countryside – the Mitford household of Mitford Sisters fame, that is. A murder on a train in broad daylight sets Louisa on the path of amateur sleuth-dom, accompanied in her endeavours by Nancy, the youngest of the Mitford sisters. Fans of Agatha Christie, or the British Library crime reprints, should be happy.  

 

 

 

 

Ask the book buyer

Looking for a book for your summer holiday? Chris can help. Pop in and see him and his team in books, floor LG, and he can help you find the book that will keep you entertained throughout the summer. Alternatively why not email him for book advice at crushby@jarrold.co.uk 

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